Drift Fishing For Salmon | Expert’s Tips and Techniques

If you have ever walked down the popular walkway across the local river and found anglers crowding the gravel bar, you might have wondered what they were doing. Well, they were more likely busy in drift fishing.

When it comes to fish salmons, drift fishing is light years ahead of other techniques. It allows you to cast the fishing line with the water flow direction and slowly move to the salmon jaw. The natural resemblance of drift fishing for salmon makes it that much productive.

What’s more, drift fishing includes fewer equipment than other salmon fishing techniques. But it doesn’t mean that you can do it without any knowledge. We have prepared a useful and practical guideline for drift fishing to get the prized King Salmon at ease.

So, shall we begin?

Tips on Drift Fishing For Salmon

Salmon fishes aren’t easy to catch. So, anglers love taking the challenge. Drift fishing for salmon benefits them as it eases out the angling and helps them get some salmons really quick. Drift fishing carries the fishing line and bait or lure much like a real one that tempts the salmon more than anything else.

However, when you think about drift fishing, there’re some sure-shot techniques. You can apply them to ensure your salmon is catching success. It includes-

45° Angle Fishing

When you drift the fishing line, there’s a simple technique to follow for the line. You should keep the fishing line right at a 45° angle as it travels from the upstream through the downstream all the way. It will help you quickly detect any fish bites.

When you set the line in a parallel direction, you would find it hard to detect the strike. Also, you are at risk of losing several lures and baits. It happens because the fishing line’s parallel run is most likely to hit leaves and rocks and get lost.

Also, ensuring an upstream drift will benefit you if you indeed want to release the fish after catching it. It provides that the fish doesn’t swallow the hook.

Pick A Lighter Spinning Rod

While most anglers almost immediately choose a heavyweight fishing rod for fishing, salmon is in its league. You must equip with a light spinning rod and reel. Also, it should suit the water condition for easy drifting.

  1. Pick a spinning rod with a reel slightly heavier than 10 pounds when fishing in a river with a strong current.
  2. A rod with 8 pounds of weight will be suitable for most fishing conditions, though.

Remember that the fishing reel and rod’s actual weight will also depend on your technique to tackle a fighting fish.

Choosing The Reel

You may choose from both the baitcasting reels and spinning reels. It will depend on your fishing preference since both the fishing reel is suitable for drift fishing.  Also, your fishing skill will largely determine the type of spinning reel you should get.  For instance, beginners can start with the Daiwa Viento series for salmon fishing.

Alternatively, you can opt for the Shimano TE series if you are skilled at drift fishing.

The reels that we recommended here are not standard spinning reels. Instead, these reels mostly resemble the baitcasting reel and will be a good investment for salmon fishing. But if you still have an irresistible liking for the conventional spool spinners with an open face, choose the Shimano Symetre reel.

Use Monofilament Fishing Line

Monofilament fishing line or backing will serve you two purposes. It has optimal visibility from above the water, and underneath the water, it dissolves entirely with the watercolor. So, fish would find it hard to locate the backing and only see the lure or bait.

Also, when you choose a high-visibility backing, it is easily identifiable from the kayak or boat. So, your friend will easily navigate the boat without disrupting the monofilament fishing line.

Pick The Pencil Lead

You should get a pencil lead with a coil for the best performance. Nonetheless, tips with hollow tubes are also acceptable. Lead loops are preferable and cheaper options too. You will need to cut the coil lead to help it act right away.

What’s more, cutting the pencil lead before heading to the fishing spot will lessen the workload. In this way, you will be better prepared for salmon drift fishing.

For the best results, begin with a 3″ long pencil fishing lead. You must pre-cut it at ¼” length each to finally get the desired 1″ long pencil leads. This will allow the bait to stay right above the water bed and detect the fish bites quickly.

Picking The Right Bait

This selection is pretty simple. Almost everyone knows that salmon eggs or roe are the best live bait for casting salmons. You can both cure and harvest these eggs at home. Alternatively, you can buy them from any fishing store.

Choose A Razor-Sharp Hook

Salmon fish has one of the strongest jaws that you might ever see in a fish of its class. And truthfully speaking, a dull hook is no match for the powerful salmon jaws. So, you must ensure that the clip you pick is razor-sharp.

Dull hooks won’t penetrate the salmon jaws, and your all efforts will fail. Hence, you need to pinpoint accurately at getting the sharpest hooks for drift fishing for the salmon.

Choose Overcasting Condition

If you want to maximize your salmon casting success rate, go on fishing in an overcast condition. It is a well-known fact that salmons like low-light conditions. So, cloudy situations will help you out in catching salmons better.

Alternatively, you can go during dawn when the light condition is at the lowest during the daytime. On a sunny day, you can get the salmon. But it will need longer fishing lines since salmon prefer resting in deep water during the bright days.

Conclusion

Drift fishing for salmon is miles ahead compared to other fishing techniques. As you drift with the actual water flow direction, it helps you hide the fishing line better. Moreover, it will allow for more comfortable salmon fishing. When you stick by with these guidelines for salmon drift fishing, chances are highly likely you will get the monster, King Salmon. Also, don’t forget to take a snap with your prized catch before you release it.

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